Ultrasound is a high-frequency sound that you cannot hear but it can be emitted and detected by special machines. It travels freely through fluid and soft tissues and is a safe and painless scan. Our procedures conform to world-class standards and PNDT guidelines.

 

Understanding the Ultrasound:

An Ultrasound is a Test procedure in which high-frequency sound waves (sonar and radio technology) are used to create ‘pictures’ of the inside of the body. Sonography refers to a medical test that is conducted with the help of an Ultrasound Device. Apart from being safe, an Ultrasound is also a painless and generally affordable process – making it popular with both patients and the medical fraternity. Ultrasound images are engineered in ‘real-time’, and let us see both the structure of our internal organs as well as the function (that is, the movement) of our blood vessels. While it has various kinds of medical uses and health applications, an Ultrasound is perhaps the most popular and preferred Test used to monitor the development of the fetus in pregnant women. An individual doesn’t normally have to go through any special preparation to taken an Ultrasound Test.

In the case of an External Ultrasound, the Transducer (a wand-like instrument) is placed over the part of the body (for example, the heart or the abdomen) that needs to be studied and has been administered a lubricating gel before-hand for this purpose. This process is usually free of any kind of pain or discomfort.

In the case of an Internal Ultrasound where the ovaries or uterus need to be studied in greater detail, the Transducer is inserted into the vagina (the process is called Endovaginal Transducer or Transvaginalsonography (TVS), in the case of females.

 

Understanding the Science Behind Ultrasound Tests

 

The term ‘Ultrasound’ literally means sounds belonging to a ‘frequency’ that humans are not able to ‘detect’ or hear. For most diagnostic applications, this frequency range lies between 2 and 18 megahertz (MHz). Higher frequencies can generate better Ultrasound image quality but are susceptible to getting absorbed (and therefore, ‘diminished in power’) by the skin and other soft tissues. Lower frequencies can penetrate deeper past the layers of skin & tissues but produce images of a relatively lower resolution and quality.

Be it external or internal, sound waves are emitted by the machine which travels through the skin and tissue till it reaches a surface that is too dense for it to penetrate further. The sound waves are then reflected back (similar to the act of light reflecting off a mirror or, say, an echo of our own voice) – resulting in an image. This image or picture is also sometimes referred to as a Sonogram. Different shades of gray indicate different densities of the reflecting surface inside the body, which can be an organ or an internal structure. Despite being different technically, the terms Ultrasound and sonogram are sometimes used interchangeably.

An Ultrasound Test is carried out by a Radiologist who has been specially trained for the purpose. An Ultrasound Test usually takes between 10 minutes to an hour, and normally doesn’t require any special preparation.

 

Instruction for Ultrasound

 

  • For ultrasound of whole abdomen patient need to have 2-3 hours fasting & full bladder.
  • For ultrasound of upper abdomen patient need to have 2-3 hours fasting. Water intake is permissible.
  • For ultrasound of lower abdomen, full bladder is required.
  • For pregnancy ultrasound fasting is not required.

 

For an Ultrasound of the gall bladder or liver (also called Ultrasound Upper Abdomen or Ultrasound Whole Abdomen), the individual needs to fast or abstain from any kind of eating for several hours before the Ultrasound begins. Some individuals may feel more comfortable in loose-fitting clothes for the duration of the Test.

A bladder that is full of water is able to generate better pictures or images of the uterus and other organs (since air is a bad conductor of ultrasound and makes the scan a failure). Therefore, in the case of an Ultrasound for a woman who is pregnant (early pregnancy) and individuals for lower abdomen ultrasound, plenty of water must be drunk – and the individual must be careful not to urinate for some time before the Test

An ultrasound machine creates images that allow various organs in the body to be examined. The machine sends out high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives these reflected waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or COLOUR Doppler scan, there is no ionizing radiation exposure with this test.

 


USG PROCEDURES

USG Whole Abdomen


Abdominal ultrasounds are used to check the major organs in the abdominal cavity. These organs include the gallbladder, kidneys, liver, pancreas, spleen & urinary bladder, prostate or uterus & its surrounding areas.



For ultrasound of whole abdomen patient need to have 2-3 hours fasting & full bladder.


USG Upper Abdomen


Upper Abdominal ultrasounds are used to check the major organs in the upper abdominal cavity. These organs include the Liver, gallbladder, spleen, kidneys & its surrounding areas.



For ultrasound of upper abdomen patient need to have 2-3 hours fasting. Water intake is permissible.


USG Lower Abdomen / Pelvis


Lower abdominal ultrasounds are used to check the major organs in the lower abdominal cavity. These organs include the urinary bladder, pelvis, prostate or uterus & its surrounding areas.



For ultrasound of lower abdomen, full bladder is required.


USG KUB Region


KUB ultrasounds are used to check the kidney, ureter, bladder & its surrounding areas.



For ultrasound of KUB, full bladder is required.


USG Pregnancy/ Fetal Well Being (FWB) / Obstetric Scan


Ultrasound of fetal well being used to check the fetal growth, fetal heart rate, fetal position & For pregnancy ultrasound fasting is not required


USG NT / NB Scan


Ultrasound of fetal well being NT used to check the fetal growth, fetal heart rate, fetal position & For pregnancy ultrasound fasting is not required.


USG TIFFA / Target Scan / Anomaly Scan/Level-II


These days, it's pretty much routine for women in their second trimester to be scheduled for a level 2 ultrasound, commonly called the 20-week anatomy scan. That's because practitioners have found that this special pregnancy ultrasound is a great way to see how a baby is developing and offer reassurance that everything is going exactly the way it should be. It's fascinating to get a sneak peek of your baby — and fun to take home a souvenir photo to start the baby album.


Who a level 2 ultrasound is for


Virtually all practitioners order an ultrasound anatomy scan for all their moms-to-be. Even if you had a first-trimester (level 1) sonogram to confirm or date your pregnancy, or as part of a first-trimester screening test, the more detailed level 2 sonogram is important because of all the additional valuable information it gives your practitioner about what's going on with your baby.


When a level 2 ultrasound is done


Most anatomy scans are performed in the second trimester of pregnancy, typically at 20 weeks but they can be done anytime between 18 weeks and 22 weeks. If you have a condition that needs to be monitored (such as carrying multiples), you may have more than one detailed ultrasound.

How a level 2 ultrasound is done

You may need to drink water before your exam so you'll have a full bladder, which makes it easier to take ultrasound images. You'll recline on an exam table with your tummy exposed, and a sonographer will apply gel and then move a wand (transducer) over your abdomen. As sound waves emitted from the transducer bounce off internal organs and fluids inside, a computer converts them into a 2-dimensional image (or cross-sectional view) of the fetus on a screen. Sometimes 3D or even 4D ultrasound technology is used instead of 2D.


TVS


A transvaginal ultrasound, also called an endovaginal ultrasound, is a type of pelvic ultrasound used by doctors to examine female reproductive organs. This includes the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, cervix, and vagina.



"Transvaginal" means "through the vagina." This is an internal examination.



Unlike a regular abdominal or pelvic ultrasound, where the ultrasound wand (transducer) rests on the outside of the pelvis, this procedure involves your doctor or a technician inserting an ultrasound probe about 2 or 3 inches into your vaginal canal. Transducer is inserted into the vagina (the process is called Endovaginal Transducer or Transvaginalsonography (TVS), in the case of females.


USG Colour Doppler Pregnancy


Doppler sonography is a technique which uses reflected sound waves to measure movements such as blood flow and heartbeat. Doppler ultrasound scans can be used to determine the speed of the blood flow and its direction. This information can be helpful in determining if the foetal growth is normal and whether the tissues are supplied with enough blood and nutrients. Doppler scans are performed with the same apparatus as a regular ultrasound scan and are normally used during the third trimester on women who have high-risk pregnancies.



What Is Doppler Scan?



A Doppler scan is similar to a regular ultrasound scan and works using high-frequency sound waves called ultrasound that aren’t audible to our ears. The ultrasound generated by the equipment bounces off bones and tissues like an echo and is recorded with a microphone. All of this is done with a small hand-held probe called a transducer. A gel which helps in the process is applied over the belly, and the transducer is pressed gently against the skin to scan. Denser substances like bones give off a better echo than the softer tissue that the body is made up of, and by comparing the echo, an image of the baby is generated in a computer and displayed in real time. What sets a Doppler scan apart is that unlike a regular ultrasound scan, it can detect the flow of blood in blood vessels, estimate the speed of the blood flow, determine its direction, detect blood clots, etc. Most ultrasound equipment these days has an inbuilt Doppler feature and both the scans can be done together.


USG Thyroid / Neck


Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland within the neck. It does not use ionizing radiation and is commonly used to evaluate lumps or nodules found during a routine physical or other imaging exam.



This procedure requires little to no special preparation. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown.